Catch me if you can

July 16, 2009 16:33 by scibuff

After a successful launch from the KSC at 22:03:10 UTC on July 15, the  Space Shuttle Endeavour is now playing a catch-up with the International Space Station (ISS) where it is planned to dock on Friday at around 18:00 UTC.

Today the crew was awaken at 12:03 UTC to the sounds of “These Are Days” by the 10,000 Maniacs played especially for astronaut Tim Kopra. Shortly afterward, the crew commenced routine in-orbit procedures with the unberthing of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) via the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), to examine Endeavour’s wing and nose cap, before heading to the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) Pods to check for any tile damage.

At 16:58 UTC, the crew is scheduled to perform Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Checkout to ensure that their system providing environmental protection, life support, and communications during extra-vehicular activity (EVA) will function properly. Next, the STS-127 astronauts will conduct the Rendezvous Tool Checkout, examine the Centerline Camera Installation and the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) Ring Extension. Finally, the crew is scheduled to go to sleep at 03:03 UTC and wake up at 11:03 UTC on Friday to being preparations for the docking with the ISS.

The ground track of Space Shuttle Endeavour - STS127 with its current position - The dashed part of the orbit path shows where the satellite is in the earth's shadow, and the full part is where it is sunlit - Source: Heavens-Above.com

The ground track of Space Shuttle Endeavour - STS127 with its current position - The dashed part of the orbit path shows where the satellite is in the earth's shadow, and the full part is where it is sunlit - Source: Heavens-Above.com

The ground track of ISS with its current position - The dashed part of the orbit path shows where the satellite is in the earths shadow, and the full part is where it is sunlit - Source: Heavens-Above.com

The ground track of ISS with its current position - The dashed part of the orbit path shows where the satellite is in the earth's shadow, and the full part is where it is sunlit - Source: Heavens-Above.com

Follow the mission via commander Mark Polansky twitter updates. Coverage of the STS-127 mission is available on NASA TV [updated NASA TV schedule is available here]. Space Shuttle Endeavour and the ISS real time position data is @ NASA’s real time tracking. Information about out about visible ISS passes at your location is available from heavens-above.

Be Sociable, Share!

Comments

0

Leave your comment:
XHTML:You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> . * required