First data from LCROSS impacts

October 9, 2009 15:29 by scibuff

Update: The LRO LAMP instrument (UV spectrometer) has confirmed detection of the ejecta plume and has begun analyzing their data. Also, the LRO Diviner instrument (Imaging Radiometer) has confirmed they have detected the #LCROSS impact crater.

First data from LCROSS impacts are coming in. Athony Colaprete, LCROSS Principal Investigator (NASA Ames), confirmed during NASA/LCROSS press conference that

We saw the impact, we saw the crater, we got spectroscopic data, which is the data we need.

Centaur impact flash detected by the Mid IR camera - Source: NASA TV

Centaur impact flash detected by the Mid IR camera from 600 km above the surface - Source: NASA TV

Centaur impact detected by visible spectrometer - Source: NASA TV

Centaur impact detected by visible spectrometer - Source: NASA TV

Jennifer Heldmann, LCROSS Observation Campaign Lead (NASA Ames), said that there is observation data from over 20 land sites as well as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and other observatories in Earth’s orbit.

Lunar crater Cabeus were taken on October 9, 2009 with the Palomar Observatory's 200-inch (5-meter) Hale Telescope and its Adaptive Optics  - Source: Palomar Observatory/Antonin Bouchez

Lunar crater Cabeus were taken on October 9, 2009 with the Palomar Observatory's 200-inch (5-meter) Hale Telescope and its Adaptive Optics - Source: Palomar Observatory/Antonin Bouchez

The public was somewhat disappointed by not seeing the ejecta plume. Although the scientists have confirmed the impact and seen a crater, there are several explanations for the lack of plumes. One could be simply that the ejecta did not “fly” high enough above the surface to escape the shadows of lunar surface. Alternatively, the ejected material could have been too faint and too spread out to be observable from almost 400,000 km. Nevertheless, Colaprete emphasized that scientific instruments were primarily focused on collecting spectra and that the first look at the data shows signs of ejected material.

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Comments

4

Jim Melka

Hi everyone,

I think the IR frames of the Centar flash are available in the NASA TV video entitled
‘NASA TV Coverage of LCROSS Impact’ at
.
I added a Lunar page to my site where you can see the probable impact of the
Centaur in an IR frame almost exactly 4 minutes before the satellite impacted.
See

But the IR impact site does not match the simulated impact site.

Jim Melka

Jim Melka

I think the IR frames of the Centar flash are available in the NASA TV video entitled
‘NASA TV Coverage of LCROSS Impact’ .
I added a Lunar page to my site where you can see the possible impact of the
Centaur in an IR frame almost exactly 4 minutes before the satellite impacted.
See
https://sites.google.com/a/asemonline.org/melka/Home/lunar-images
But the IR impact site does not match the simulated impact site.

Jim Melka

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Speaker-to-Animals

Who can tell us what the spectrometric graph indicates? Is there water, as previously suspected? Is it, indeed, less than what can be found in the driest desert on Earth?

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