Chandrayaan images – Another blow to Moon landing conspiracy theories

September 3, 2009 15:30 by scibuff

Although the Chandrayaan 1 mission by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) ended prematurely when scientists lost contact with the spacecraft on August 28, 2009, the agency claimed it to be a grand success in that it completed its major tasks.

Apart from the primary objectives to prepare a 3D atlas with the resolution of up to 10-5m and chemical and mineralogical mapping of the entire lunar surface, the terrain mapping camera on board the spacecraft has also sent images of the landing site of Apollo 15 and the tracks of land rovers astronauts used to travel on the lunar surface.

Apollo 15 lunar module, Falcon - Image Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University

Apollo 15 lunar module, Falcon - Image Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University

Analysis of data from the onboard Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) and the Hyper Spectral Imager (HySi) revealed disturbances on the the lunar surface show tracks on Lunar Roving Vehicles (LRV) used by astronauts on Apollo 15, 16 and 17.

That’s right, all your Moon landing deniers (read crazy people). Here are photos and data acquired by instruments built by an agency from a different country on board a spacecraft launched into lunar orbit independently of NASA – Chandrayaan 1 also carried NASA instruments but the TMC was built in ISRO’s Space Applications Centre (SAC).

I’m truly curious how Moon hoaxers tackle this one. Meanwhile, the rest of us who live in a real world will no doubt enjoy in awe all other wonders of the universe.

Inside Story – India’s moon mission

September 1, 2009 21:50 by scibuff

The Chandrayaan 1 (literally translated as the “moon vehicle”) spacecraft was launched on 22 October 2008 from Sriharikota Andhra Pradesh aboard India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). The primary objectives of the mission (apart from developing the means of placing a spacecraft into a lunar orbit) were the preparation of a 3D atlas with the resolution of up to 10-5m and chemical and mineralogical mapping of the entire lunar surface. After completing almost 95% of the scheduled tasks within the first 312 days of its 2 year-long mission, the scientists of the Indian Space Research Organization lost all communications with the spacecraft on August 28, 2009.