Astronews Daily (2455468)

September 28, 2010 15:32 by scibuff

Top Stories

NASA showdown looms as shuttle workers face layoffs – With more than 1,500 space shuttle workers facing layoffs this week, legislators say they will take a final shot at passing a blueprint for the U.S. human space program before adjourning ahead of the November 2 congressional elections. -Reuters

How investments in space technology research can pay back big time – As the UK government ponders how much money it can afford to invest in research, it will want to reflect on Tuesday’s announcement from Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) and the rather small amount of public cash it sent the company’s way in 2000. -Jonathan Amos / BBC

How big is your camera? Astronomers use a 1.4 *giga*pixel camera to nab a potentially hazardous asteroid – The sky is big. Searching it for potentially hazard objects like asteroids and comets is hard. The best way to do it? A big ’scope, equipped with a BIG camera, and a wide, wide field of view. That’s just what the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System — PanSTARRS — brings to the table. It’s just a prototype, but it has a 1.8 meter ’scope on — wait for it, wait for it — Mount Haleakala, and it sports a 1.4 gigapixel camera. You read that right: 1.4 billion pixels. -Phil Plait / Bad Astronomy / Discovery Blogs

Videos

SDO has entered eclipse season. Around the time of the equinoxes, the spacecraft, Earth, and sun can line up almost perfectly. Once a day for about an hour, Earth blocks SDO

Photos

The Full Moon Over the Andes

The Full Moon Over the Andes

Vegas Moon & Eiffel Tower

Vegas Moon & Eiffel Tower

Observe the Moon

Observe the Moon - NASA

2010 ST3 taken by PS1

2010 ST3 taken by PS1 - PS1SC

  

Gallery Pick of the Day

The Earth at night with Aurora Australis

The Earth at night with Aurora Australis - Credit: Douglas H. Wheelock (@Astro_Wheels) / Expedition 24-25 / NASA

The photo above is “Pick of the Day” from one of the three galleries: Astronomy Gallery, Space Shuttle Gallery and Space Station Gallery. The photo was taken by Douglas H. Wheelock (@Astro_Wheels), a member of the Expedition 24/25 crew, and the first US Army astronaut to command the International Space Station.

Longest eclipse of the century

July 22, 2009 14:59 by scibuff

If 2009 is the International Year of Astronomy, then the past few days definitely qualify as The #1 Week of that year. Not only did we celebrate the 40th anniversary of the first footsteps of a man on the Moon and observed an Earth-sized dark stop on Jupiter exactly 15 years after comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 plunged into Jupiter’s southern hemisphere “in a 1 in 15,000 years event”, but early today, countless spectators in East Asia saw another spectacular show of the nature.

The longest total solar eclipse of the 21st century (unmatched until Jun 13, 2132), began just off the coast of India at 00:51:16.9 UTC and ended in Polynesia at 04:19:26.5 UTC. At maximum (02:35:21 UTC) about 100 km south of the Bonin Islands, southeast of Japan, the eclipse lasted stunning 6 minutes and 38.8 seconds. The uninhabited North Iwo Jima island was the landmass with totality time closest to maximum, while the closest inhabited point was Akusekijima, where the eclipse lasted 6 minutes and 26 seconds.

Solar corona from Hangzhou (Tianmu Mountain), China - Photo Credit: jaaron

Solar corona from Hangzhou (Tianmu Mountain), China - Photo Credit: jaaron

Baily's beads - Photo Credit: SAROS 2009

Baily's beads - Photo Credit: SAROS 2009

Diamond Ring at the end of the total eclipse - Photo Credit: Manuel Secher

Diamond Ring at the end of the total eclipse - Photo Credit: Manuel Secher