Amateur footage of STS-130 launch wanted

March 9, 2010 17:48 by scibuff

If you have shot (probably) the last night Space Shuttle launch a few weeks back and you’d be interested in sharing the footage with the rest of the world, read on:

ATTENTION: NASA buffs 8 to 88, amateur and pro video makers and photographers!

Motherboard.tv is making a film about the launch of STS-130 as seen from the perspective of NASA scientists and everyday fans of all ages.

Don’t worry about quality — we’re looking to capture moments that are both exciting and mundane, including footage of you and your group driving to and getting ready for the launch. We are looking for both the shaky, unplanned stuff and the shots that took hours to set up. You will be credited in the final project, and eligible for prizes!

Contact us for instructions on sending photo and video: Brayden@motherboard.tv

STS-130 Rendezvous Sunset

February 10, 2010 09:07 by scibuff

Before the Space Shuttle Endeavour docked with the International Space Station at 05:06 UTC, the camera outside of the station captured this beautiful sunset on orbit with the orbiter seen against the horizon of the Earth. At that point, Endeavour was on a rendezvous course behind the station at the distance of about 8.2 km orbiting the Earth at an altitude of roughly 346 km.

Sunset on orbit - Source: NASA TV

Launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour (Video)

February 8, 2010 14:01 by scibuff

Space Shuttle Endeavour, carrying Commander George Zamka, pilot Terry Virts, and Mission Specialists Nicholas Patrick, Bob Behnken, Steve Robinson and Kay Hire, successfully launched from the Kennedy Space Center at 09:14:07 UTC on February 8, headed for its 13-day STS-130 mission to the International Space Station.

The launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-130 mission to the ISS - Credit: NASA

Endeavour launched successfully

February 8, 2010 09:24 by scibuff

Update 4: Launch in HD

The launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-130 mission to the ISS - Credit: NASA

Update 3: Long exposure of the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour by Lenny Maiorani:

Long exposure of the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour

Long exposure of the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour - Credit: Lenny Maiorani

Update 2: Visit the Space Shuttle Gallery for more launch photos.

Update 1: Launch HD Photos

Space shuttle Endeavour lifts off from the Launch Pad 39A

Space shuttle Endeavour lifts off from the Launch Pad 39A on the last planned night launch of the space shuttle program - Credit: collectSPACE/Robert Pearlman

Take off of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station

Take off of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station - Credit: NASA

February 8, 2010 at 09:14:07 UTC, NASA successfully launched the Space Shuttle Endeavour on its 24th mission – the 11th to the International Space Station (ISS). Six crew members of STS-130, commanded by NASA astronaut George D. Zamka (STS-120), will stay in space 12 Days 18 Hours 37 Minutes and land at the Kennedy Space Center on February 21, 2010 (UTC time). Mission specialists Robert Behnken and Nicholas Patrick will combine for 19.5 hours during 3 planed spacewalks (EVA). The STS-130 mission kicks off the final year of shuttle flights, with five missions planned through September (STS-133).

Lift-off of the Space Shuttle Endeavour

Lift-off of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station

Take off of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station

Take off of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station - Credit: NASA TV

Endeavour will arrive at the orbiting complex in the early morning hours Wednesday, February 10. Once docked, hatches will be opened between the two spacecraft and a combined crew of 11 will begin eight days of work. Endeavour’s crew will be working with Expedition 22 commander NASA astronaut Jeff Williams and flight engineers cosmonaut Max Suraev, NASA astronaut T.J. Creamer and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi. Noguchi and Robinson flew together on the STS-114 space shuttle return-to-flight mission in 2005.

The International Space Station against the background of a cloud covered Earth

Set against the background of a cloud covered Earth, the International Space Station is featured in this image photographed by an STS-129 crew member on Atlantis soon after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation - Credit: NASA

STS-130 will be the first spaceflight for the shuttle pilot Terry Virts. Mission Specialist Kathryn Hire flew the STS-90 Neurolab mission spending 15 days in space. STS-130 will be the second spaceflight also for Nicholas Patrick (STS-116) and Robert Behnken (STS-123). Veteran astronaut Stephen Robinson flew on STS-85 in 1997, STS-95 in 1998 and STS-114 in 2005. He has logged more than 831 hours in space, including more than 20 hours of spacewalking time. He has also held various technical assignments within the Astronaut Office including testing space shuttle control software in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory and helping to develop the space station robot arm.

The crew of Space Shuttle Endevaour STS-130

The STS-130 crew is commanded by George Zamka (seated, right) and piloted by Terry Virts (seated, left). Standing from the left are mission specialists Nicholas Patrick, Robert Behnken, Kathryn Hire and Stephen Robinson

The mission will deliver and assemble the last US module onto the International Space Station. Node 3, known as Tranquility, will provide additional room for crew members and many of the space station’s life support and environmental control systems. Attached to the node is a cupola, which is a robotic control station with six windows around its sides and another in the center that will provide a panoramic view of Earth, celestial objects and visiting spacecraft.

The interior of the ISS Node 3

The interior of the International Space Station's Node 3, named Tranquility, is seen for the last time on Earth before its hatch is shut - NASA/Jim Grossmann

Tucked away inside Tranquility and Endeavour’s mid-deck will be a ton of equipment, supplies and experiments for the space station. Included are a new distillation assembly and fluid control pump assembly for the urine processing assembly, an external filter assembly for the water processing assembly, a new bed for the carbon dioxide removal assembly, laptop computers, crew provisions, health care supplies, spacewalk tools and others.

The crew of STS-130 at the launch page

At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crew of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission posed for a group portrait in front of Endeavour's external tank and one of its solid rocket boosters at the conclusion of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, the dress rehearsal for their launch. From left are Robert Behnken, Commander George Zamka, pilot Terry Virts, Kathryn Hire, Nicholas Patrick and Stephen Robinson - Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The next mission to the ISS will be STS-131 (ISS assembly flight 19A) planned to launch on at 18:34 UTC on March 18, 2010. The primary payload of STS-131 is scheduled to be the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello.

Endeavour last flight is scheduled for July 29, 2010. The STS-134 mission (assembly flight ULF6) will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer and the third ExPRESS Logistics Carrier to the to the station.

The space shuttle Endeavour at the Launch Pad

The space shuttle Endeavour is seen after the rotating service structure is rolled back on Saturday, Feb. 6, 2010 at Launch Pad 39A of the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida - Credit: NASA/Bill Ingals

STS-130 Launch Timeline

February 8, 2010 09:22 by scibuff

Update 2: I replaced the SD photos with the respective HD versions.

Update 1: See the mission details and more photos in my STS-130 Space Shuttle Endeavour post.

The milestones of STS-130 Space Shuttle Endeavour launch (reverse order):

~ 04:23:52 GMT @ T+09:45 – Nominal MECO, OMS-1 not required. With a direct insertion ascent, the main engines are burned slightly longer to achieve the desired apogee altitude, such that an OMS-1 maneuver (which would supply the additional thrust needed to reach orbit) is not required.

– 04:22:40 GMT @ T+08:33 – External Tank (ET) separation.

The External Tank (ET) separates from the orbiter

The External Tank (ET) separates from the orbiter after the Main Engine Cut-Off (MECO) - Credit: NASA TV

– 04:22:39 GMT @ T+08:32 – Zero Thrust.

– 04:22:30 GMT @ T+08:23 –  Main Engine Cut-off (MECO). Endeavour has reach the planned orbit and is schedule to dock with the International Space Station on Flight Day 3.

– 04:21:49 GMT @ T+07:42 –  Negative Istres.

– 04:21:28 GMT @ T+07:21 –  Negative Moron.

– 04:21:15 GMT @ T+07:08 – Single Engine Press. Endeavour can reach the planned orbit on a single SSME should two of the engines fail.

– 04:20:47 GMT @ T+06:40 – Nominal Shutdown, Go for the plus X, Go for the pitch maneuver. After the External Tank (ET) separation (SEP) the orbiter’s Reaction Control System (RCS) will execute a negative Z (in the direction up through the roof) translation maneuver to move the orbiter away from the ET. The “go for the pitch” refers to the ET Photo maneuver, which is a pitch around of the orbiter that allows the crew to take pictures of the tank out of the overhead windows.

– 04:20:21 GMT @ T+06:14 – Press to MECO and Single Engine Zaragoza 104 – Endeavour can now reach planned orbit in case of a single SSME failure and the Zaragoza TAL site on a single engine at 104.5% throttle.

– 04:19:37 GMT @ T+05:30 – Single Engine OPS-3 – Endeavour could now reach the designated TAL site with a single engine at Full Power Level (FPL), i.e 109% throttle, should two of the SSME‘s fail (the OPS-3 software mode will be used for re-entry) – Prior to this point, the loss of two engines requires contingency abort procedures and OPS 6 software.

– 04:19:18 GMT @ T+05:11 – Press to ATO select Zaragoza – Endeavour could now reach a safe orbit (circular / 194.5 km) with two Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) throttled at Typical Mission Power Level (104.5%) in case of a single SSME failure. Should one of the engines fail the crew could execute the Abort To Orbit (ATO) maneuver (in case of TAL abort, the landing facility in Zaragoza would be used).

– 04:17:59 GMT @ T+03:52 – Negative Return – Endeavour has used too much fuel and is traveling too fast (7,795 km/h), too high (96 km) and is too far (200 km) to return to the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for a potential Return To Launch Site (RTLS) abort.

04:17:01 GMT @ T+02:54 – 2 engine Istres. Endeavour can now reach the Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) site in Istres in the case of a single engine failure.

04:16:50 GMT @ T+02:43 – 2 engine Zaragoza. Endeavour can now reach the TAL site in Zaragoza in the case of a single engine failure.

04:16:45 GMT @ T+02:38 – 2 engine Moron. Endeavour can now reach the TAL site in Moron in the case of a single engine failure.

– 04:16:22 GMT @ T+02:15 – Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) assist.

– 04:16:12 GMT @ T+02:05Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) separation. Endeavour is at the altitude of 47.18 km, 44.57 km down range from the KSC, traveling at 4 794.4 km/h (Mach 4).

Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) separation

Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) separation - Credit: NASA TV

– 04:15:04 GMT @ T+00:54 –Throttle up back to 104.5% engine power level.

– 04:14:56 GMT @ T+00:49 – Max-Q (the point of the greatest dynamic pressure).

– 04:14:50 GMT @ T+00:43 – Mach 1.

– 04:14:46 GMT @ T+00:39 – Throttle down from 104.5% to 72.0% engine power level at Mach 0.9.

Endeavour's engines are throttling down

Endeavour's engines are throttling down as the orbiter passes through the area of maximum pressure on the vehicle - Credit: NASA TV

– 04:14:26 GMT @ T+00:19 – Roll maneuver finished.

– 04:14:17 GMT @ T+00:10 – Start the roll program.

– 04:14:07 GMT @ T-00:00 – Lift-off. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) ignition and lift-off of the Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-130 (ISS assembly flight 20A) mission to the International Space Station (ISS).

Lift-off of Space Shuttle Endeavour

Lift-off of Space Shuttle Endeavour from Launch Pad 39A - Credit: NASA TV

– 04:14:00 GMT @ T-00:06.6 (and 06.48, 06.36) – The three Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) start.

The Space Shuttle Main Engines ignite

The Space Shuttle Main Engines ignite - Credit: NASA TV

– 04:13:58 GMT @ T-00:09 – The hydrogen burn-off system begins to eliminate free hydrogen exhausted into the main engine nozzles during the start sequence to prevent small, but potentially dangerous, explosions when the main engines ignite.

The hydrogen burn-off system is activated

The hydrogen burn-off system is activated - Credit: NASA TV

– 04:13:52 GMT @ T-00:15 – The Sound Suppression Water System has been activated to protect Endeavour and the launch pad from acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and Mobile Launcher Platform during launch.

– 04:13:36 GMT @ T-00:31 – Auto-sequence start. Endeavour’s on-board computers have primary control of all vehicle’s critical functions.

04:05:07 GMT: The countdown clock resumes at T-9min and counting.

Shuttle Endeavour’s hatch has been closed and latched for flight, the six STS-130 astronauts are strapped into their seats.

The countdown clock resumes at T-3hr and counting.

The STS-130 crew leaves the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building and board the Astrovan to head to the Pad 39A.

The STS-130 crew shortly before boarding the Astrovan

The STS-130 crew shortly before boarding the Astrovan - Credit: Jen Scheer

–  Final inspection team is on the pad looking for ice & frost buildup on the External Tank.

02:54 GMT: The shuttle tanking went into a stable replenish and the countdown entered a 2.5 hour long inbuilt hold at T-3 hours.

– The liquid hydrogen tanking has reached 98% and will transition from fast-full to top-off at 2700 l per minute.

–  Liquid oxygen tanking changes to fast-fill mode at almost 6,000 l per minute. Liquid hydrogen is also in fast-fill phase adding almost 32,000 liters every minute into the external tank (ET).

–  Launch teams began liquid oxygen tanking in the slow-fill phase adding 1,200 liters every minute.

23:50 (Feb. 07) GMT: Fueling of the External Tank began with liquid hydrogen (at 20K) started in the slow-fill mode. Liquid oxygen (at 90.188 K) will follow at 00:20 GMT.

Endeavour launch postponed

February 7, 2010 09:41 by scibuff

February 7, 2010 at 09:30 UTC, NASA’s launch director (LD) Pete Nickolenko Mike Leinbach coordinating with the Mission Management Team (MMT) called off today’s launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavor on the STS-130 mission during the final T-9 minute hold while polling stations for the Go/No-Go for launch, due violations in launch weather criteria ending thus a “full dress launch rehearsal” for the crew of STS-130.

The main culprit today was the range weather, i.e. low clouds over the launch page. In addition to the launch site weather violations, the Mission Control in Houston also called a No-Go due to unacceptable weather forecast for a possible Return To Launch Site (RTLS) abort.

The teams will execute a 24 hour scrub turnaround procedure and attempt another launch tomorrow. The launch window tomorrow will open at 09:09:02 UTC and closes at 09:19:02 UTC with the optimal launch time at 09:14:07 UTC.

The T-9 min in-built starts

The T-9 min in-built starts - Photo Credit: NASA TV/Spacevidcast

Don’t forget to check out the Space Shuttle Gallery and follow @SpaceShuttlePix for updates.

Space shuttle Endeavour bathed in light

Space shuttle Endeavour, STS-130, is bathed in light on launch pad 39A Saturday, February 7, 2010 awaiting blastoff to the International Space Station Sunday morning at 4:39 am. - Credit: Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel